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here in new york city and is a fellow at the roosevelt institute. susan crawford, welcome. >> thank you so much. >> "captive audience?" who's the captive? >> us, all of us. what's happened is that these enormous telecommunications companies, comcast and time warner on the wired side, verizon and at&t on the wireless side, have divided up markets, put themselves in the position where they're subject to no competition and no oversight from any regulatory authority. and they're charging us a lot for internet access and giving us second class access. this is a lot like the elecifation story from the beginng othe 20th ctury. initially electricity was viewed as a luxury. so when f.d.r. came in, 90% of farms didn't have electricity in america at the same time that kids in new york city were playing with electric toys. and f.d.r. understood how important it was for people all over america to have the dignity and self-respect and sort of cultural and social and economic connection of an electrical outlet in thr home. so he made sure to take on the special interests that were controlling electric
have occupied the airport at a third key city-- kidal. in paris today, the french defense minister said his government is open to having u.n. peacekeepers take over, with french support. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and we turn to two stories about conflict in the middle east. as the battle in syria between president bashar al-assad's forces and the free syrian army or f.s.a. rages on, thousands of refugees flood into neighboring countries. jonathan miller of "independent television news" takes us to a secret crossing point on the border with jordan on the outskirts of the syrian city of da'-raa. >> reporter: katiba jaber is a lonely place, exposed to desert winds that chill you to the bone. the border guard is ready for what the night will bring. ( gunfire ) the shooting started shortly after sunset. those are close. the syrians fire at the jordanians every night but the jordanians don't fire back. and bashar's forces shoot and shell the groups of refugees hiding somewhere down there in the darkness. unexpectedly, a jordanian ambulance arrives
for the hour, next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the story of dk cheney is the story of power. he served two terms as vice president, president george w. bush from twub two 2008. he was also secretary of defense he was also chief of staff to president gerald ford. the "washington post" has called him the most influential and powerful man ever to hold the office. he was in washington an insider. his story is a story not only of power but because of what happened after 9/11 it's a story of power and values. we begin a conversation that took place in washington. mr. vice predent, thank you very mu for taking time to see us for this conversation. how's your health? >> much, much bet, thank you. i had lived with coronary artery disease since i was 37 years old 1978. had six heart attacks and nearly everything else that you could do yourself. i had an episode of ventricular fibrillation, my heart stopped. my life was saved by an implanted defibrillator. so i've been through a lot a as of last march i got a
continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin tonight with a look at the crises in syria. nearly 70,000 people have died in one of the most deadly civil wars in recent history. two years in and the community has debated how to intervene. the united states hasiven nearly $400 million in humanitarian aid. he's remained fragmented and disorganized. as the violence skates the united states has increasing efforts to arm the groups. joining me is michael gordon the chief military correspondent for the "new york times." i'm please to do have him on this program. welcome. >> nice to be here. >> much to talk about. let me begin with syria. we all know from congressional testimony from leon panetta the former sect of defense and others that there was a recommendation from leon panetta and from david petraeus at ci and from hillary clinton at state to do something. >> so what happened, i believe, and i did a lot of reporting on it. and actually it was an article that i worked on with mark rangler that was the basis
characters of different regions and at the cities, and in that sense, he was a quintessential american. >> colorful. him ones interviewing one time and stop the interview and said, this is good stuff. i would like a copy of this. [laughter] ed koch, dead at the age of 88. that is the last word. banks. see you next week.
, tokyo. >>> vietnamese who live in rural areas are starting to see the effects of the city on their daily lives. urban pollution is spreading to the countryside, and it's affecting their health. but some japanese businesspeople have stepped in to help. nhk world has more from hanoi. >> reporter: vietnam's economy is racing ahead. but not everybody is moving forward. hanoi is crowded with motorbikes. across the country, people work with circumstances in the environment. this river running through tepco is dangerous. the environment readings are four times higher than recommended by the government. people living downstream are suffering the consequences. juan and his wife were born and raised in this village. they are farmers who survive by growing rice and other crops. the day is spent walking in the rice paddies. >> translator: the watery fill my paddies with is black. my legs itch from working in the rice fields. water shouldn't be black, but i have no choice but to use that terrible water for farming. >> reporter: there are many such worries about pollution. a new deal originating in ja
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)